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Students should analyze a system in terms of its components and how these components relate to each other, to the whole, and to the external environment. The student is expected to: (A) demonstrate safe practices during laboratory and field investigations, including chemical, electrical, and fire safety, and safe handling of live and preserved organisms; and (B) demonstrate an understanding of the use and conservation of resources and the proper disposal or recycling of materials. The student uses scientific methods during laboratory and field investigations.

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Local natural environments are to be preferred over artificial or virtual environments.

The student is expected to: (A) evaluate data over a period of time from an established aquatic environment documenting seasonal changes and the behavior of organisms; (B) collect baseline quantitative data, including p H, salinity, temperature, mineral content, nitrogen compounds, and turbidity from an aquatic environment; (C) analyze interrelationships among producers, consumers, and decomposers in a local aquatic ecosystem; and (D) identify the interdependence of organisms in an aquatic environment such as in a pond, river, lake, ocean, or aquifer and the biosphere. The student knows the role of cycles in an aquatic environment.

The student is expected to: (A) in all fields of science, analyze, evaluate, and critique scientific explanations by using empirical evidence, logical reasoning, and experimental and observational testing, including examining all sides of scientific evidence of those scientific explanations, so as to encourage critical thinking by the student; (B) communicate and apply scientific information extracted from various sources such as current events, news reports, published journal articles, and marketing materials; (C) draw inferences based on data related to promotional materials for products and services; (D) evaluate the impact of research and technology on scientific thought, society, and the environment; (E) describe the connection between aquatic science and future careers; and (F) research and describe the history of aquatic science and contributions of scientists. Students know that aquatic environments are the product of Earth systems interactions.

The student is expected to: (A) identify key features and characteristics of atmospheric, geological, hydrological, and biological systems as they relate to aquatic environments; (B) apply systems thinking to the examination of aquatic environments, including positive and negative feedback cycles; and (C) collect and evaluate global environmental data using technology such as maps, visualizations, satellite data, Global Positioning System (GPS), Geographic Information System (GIS), weather balloons, buoys, etc. The student conducts long-term studies on local aquatic environments.

The student is expected to: (A) identify the role of carbon, nitrogen, water, and nutrient cycles in an aquatic environment, including upwellings and turnovers; and (B) examine the interrelationships between aquatic systems and climate and weather, including El Nio and La Nia, currents, and hurricanes. The student knows the origin and use of water in a watershed.